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Saturday, November 18, 2017

Q&A FROM TOWN HALL MEETINGS #3


TRAIN YOUR BRAIN


Great article written by Angie Ferguson, a triathlon coach, but it could be applied to any endeavor in life...

Some people think the body is the strongest asset an athlete has, but I beg to differ. You can have the strongest body, healthiest heart or biggest biceps, but if you don’t have a strong mind, you will be beaten every time. If you really want to make positive changes in your fitness and/or take your training to the next level, you need to think about training your brain.

Training the brain does not involve any Jedi mind tricks. It just requires a desire to change and a plan of action. First, decide what’s holding you back. Decide what needs to change. What about your subconscious is holding you back? The idea of success? Selfworth or a lack of belief that you deserve to be successful? Lack of skills? Do you need to learn a new skill to compete at a higher level?

Determine exactly what needs to be changed and set a new course of brainpower action. Next, make note of your mental negatives and reframe your thinking and self-talk. The messages we send ourselves have a far greater impact on our performance than any amount of training. For example, if you tell yourself, “I can’t run, I’m not fast enough, and it hurts too much,” this becomes a self fulfilling prophecy.

However, the opposite is true as well. Once you recognize these negative statements, train your brain to replace those negative thoughts with positive ones like, “I can do this, I am a runner, and I am strong.” These too become self fulfilling prophecies but with a much more positive outcome. Make a conscious effort to review your new thoughts daily. Write them down and post them somewhere you’ll see them each day.

It takes time and effort to re-pattern our thought processes. Making your goal more than just a onetime declaration will help keep you accountable and force your brain to take on this new thought. You will constantly be thinking about it and repeating it. The more you engage the brain in this new patterned thinking, the more you go over these new positive messages, the more your subconscious will believe them to be true and therefore your plan of action will be different.

 The steps you take toward your goal will be driven by the fact that you have begun to see and know that you will continue to see success. Finally, don’t be afraid to embrace failure. So what if you had a setback and missed your mark or posted a slower time? No big deal. What’s going to bring you success is getting back up, reevaluating what happened, learning from the experience and resetting a new thought process designed to achieve your goals.

It is never shortcomings or failures that keep people from realizing their dreams. It’s what they decide to do after they fall. Never let what you think you can’t do get in the way of what you can do.

Angie Ferguson is an exercise physiologist from Fort Myers, Florida. She is a USA Triathlon Advanced Level 2 coach, USA Cycling coach and has a Specialty in Sports Nutrition certification.

Friday, November 17, 2017

PRO-LIFE UPDATE


Dig. of Life Header
Families and Adoptive Families - Do You Have Room At Your Table This Thanksgiving?

November is one of my favorite times of year. Why? Fall, Thanksgiving and family. The month begins with a cool crispness in the air and the myriad of emerging fall colors delighting us with their increasing intensity. The end of the month brings Thanksgiving and the once a year Feast that calls us to give thanks for the many special people in our lives.

Most of us have been blessed to be part of a family, so we enjoy and give gratitude for our spouses, our children, our parents, sibling and close friends. There's nothing much better than sharing delicious Thanksgiving comfort food and long overdue warm conversations with family members and friends. And while every family has its ups and down, there is a sense of belonging that forms our identity. The sense of belonging to family is a universal longing based on our inward desire for something greater than ourselves that we are part of. St. John Paul in an Apostolic Exhortation on the Family, Familiaris Consortio succinctly stated that the family is "a communion and community of persons where love is the source and the constant impetus for welcoming, respecting and promoting each one of its members in his or her lofty dignity as a person, that is, as a living image of God."

According to Karyn Hall, PH.D, "Having a sense of belonging is a human need, just like the need for food and shelter. Feeling that you belong is most important in seeing value in life and in coping with intensely painful emotions. Some find belonging in a church, some with friends, some with family, and some on Twitter or other social media. Some see themselves as connected only to one or two people. Others believe and feel a connection to all people the world over, to humanity. Some struggle to find a sense of belonging and their loneliness is physically painful for them."

November is also National Adoption Month providing a time to reflect on the gift of family, but also to remember that we are called to "bring justice to the fatherless (the orphans)." For orphans and children in foster care who have been separated from their families, these feeling of being disconnected can be overwhelming and sometimes can lead to despair or depression. The Catholic Bishops remind us that "welcoming a child, through adoption, is an act of faith as well as an act of love." Through the loving gift of adoption, children who need a family, can rebuild their sense of identity and their sense of belonging. In Amoris Laetitia, Pope Francis asserts "Adopting a child is an act of love, offering the gift of a family to someone who has none."

Even those who have been successfully adopted, struggle at times with reconciling feelings about their biological parents with their adoptive parents. And that's why family is so necessary. Family life, whether biological or not, inherently, unites, and satisfies our need to belong and to be needed and appreciated, simply for who we are. 

Thanksgiving is a time to be grateful for adoptive parents, but also to remember the sacrifice of the natural parents who were open to life and yet willing to put the needs of an unborn child first. Perhaps, this Thanksgiving, we can make room in our hearts, and maybe even at our dinner table, for a child waiting to be adopted, or for a single mother who has placed her child with and adoptive family. The following poem reveals the loving sacrifices from both the adoptive parents and biological parents, and the in this case, the gifts of both "mothers."

Legacy Of An Adoptive Child

Once there were two women who never knew each other.
One you do not remember, the other you call mother.
Two different lives, shaped to make your one.
The first became your guiding star, the second became your sun.
The first gave you life and the second taught you to live it.
The first gave you a need for love, and the second was there to give it.
One gave you a nationality, the other gave you a name.
One gave you a seed of talent, the other gave you an aim.
One gave you emotions, the other calmed your fears.
One saw your first sweet smile, the other dried your tears.
One placed you for adoption that's all that she could do.
The other prayed for a child and God led her straight to you.
And now you ask me, through your fears,
the age-old question unanswered throughout the years.
Heredity or environment, which are you the product of?
Neither, my darling neither.
Just a precious human being from two different kinds of love.
        ~ Author Unknown ~
Respect Life Events, news and Updates:

Social Media Highlights
Photos, Videos & Comments
- Archbishop Kurtz Elected as Chair of USCCb Religious Liberty Committee
- Annual KRLA Conference
- 40 Days for Life
- Respect Life Month
  • Religious Freedom: Supreme Court to Hear Challenge to California Law Violating Key Free Speech 
     
  • Words to live by: "Adoption not abortion"
  • Child Sex Trafficking is Growing
    What Can We Do?
  • March for Life Pilgrimage 2018
  • Immaculata Speaker Series with Dr. Peter Kreeft!
     
  • "Parable of the Talents"
    by Bishop Robert Barron November 19, 2017
Feel Free to share your comments on the Archdiocese of Louisville Family Ministries Facebook pagehttps://www.facebook.com/ArchdioceseLouisvilleFamilyMinistries/

Remain steadfast in faith.
Ed

Ed Harpring
Coordinator of Pro-Life Ministries
"Conception to Natural Death"
502-471-2154

Social Media - Videos & Comments
Archbishop Kurtz elected as USCCB 
Chair of Religious Liberty Committee

 Annual KRLA Conference - November 11, 2017


 





 
TO THE COURTS: Supreme Court to Hear Challenge to California Law Violating Key Free Speech, Religious Freedom Rights

In 2015, the state of California passed a law forcing privately funded pro-life pregnancy centers to promote taxpayer-funded abortions, threatening crippling fines for noncompliance. As of Monday morning, that edict is under review by the Supreme Court.

Announcing it will hear pro-lifers' challenge to the so-called "Reproductive FACT Act," the Court's announcement comes just two weeks after a California superior court judge granted an injunction against the law on grounds that it violates the state's Declaration of Rights.

Now, a long-fought battle to keep the Golden State from forcing its pro-life citizens to choose between obeying conscience or the law of the land is on its way to Washington, D.C., for a final decision in National Institute of Family and Life Advocates (NIFLA) v. Becerra.

"By God's grace, we now have an opportunity to secure a win for free speech and freedom of conscience at the Supreme Court," Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF), which is representing NIFLA in the case, wrote in an email alert Monday morning. "And a victory could protect pro-life pregnancy centers nationwide from becoming forced mouthpieces for Big Abortion's message of death."

To read more click here:





Words to live by: "Adoption not abortion"
By Dave Andrusko

Editor's note. November is National Adoption Month. 

One of the great privileges of working at National Right to Life is that pro-lifers from around the world routinely send us news stories, personal stories, and-in many ways best of all-photos.
The photo you see below was sent to us by R. Widing who gave me permission to share it with our NRL News Today readers. Mr. Widing sent along a brief note that read, "As you can see from the attached photo, our son adores the baby on this adoption bumper sticker we bought from Oregon Right to Life! Keep up the great work!"

"Adoption not abortion." Three powerful words that are a part of every pro-lifer's vocabulary. Both my wife's family and my family have been blessed by children adopted from as far away as Brazil and as close as Massachusetts. As their aunt and uncle, we, in turn, were privileged to get to know these young women, one of whom is herself now a mother.

To read more click here.

Child Sex Trafficking is Growing
What Can We Do?

There are more victims of slavery today than ever before in human history.  It is so well-hidden that we can live our entire lives without ever realizing its pervasiveness.  It occurs in every country on earth, with victims numbering in the tens of millions.  It exists in many forms: forced labour in a wide range of service industries, child soldiering, forced begging, and, most prevalently, commercial sexual exploitation - "sex trafficking."

As the fastest-growing form of organized crime and the third-largest criminal enterprise in the world, sex-trafficking has become a critically-urgent problem internationally, though the majority of victims come from the Asia-Pacific region, where traffickers easily exploit poverty-induced vulnerabilities.  Although women and girls are most frequently targeted, boys make up a significant - and under-reported - number of victims.  And while traffickers are usually male, in some countries women are the main perpetrators.

To read more click here.




















March for Life Pilgrimage 2018

Youth and adults from Louisville and around the state will be heading to Washington, D.C. in January 2018, to advocate for those who cannot speak for themselves--the unborn and the vulnerable. 

As Christ admonishes to "do this to the least of these", The Church has an undeniable call to defend, protect, and provide public witness for the respect of all human life from conception until natural death.  We invite you to join us in partnership with KRLA to board busses on January 17th and returning on January 20th,2018.

March for Life Pilgrimage
 
Pilgrimage includes:
    • St. John Paul II Shrine tour
    • (Optional) Holocaust Museum
    • Meeting with Archbishop Kurtz (USCCB headquarters) on Thursday, January 18th at 1:00PM
    • Pro-Life Vigil Mass - at The Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception
    • Youth Mass and Rally Capital one Arena
    • March for Life
    • Visit with State Senator or State Representative
PRICE: Based on 46 persons per bus. Includes: round trip on Tour Buses; 1 nights lodging at Holiday Inn Express & Suites; 1 breakfast meal & 1 pizza meal at hotel
Total Package Price (per person) - 4/rm - $1933/rm - $203;2/rm - $224;1/rm - $289

Trip sponsored by
Kentucky Right to Life Association
134 Breckinridge Lane, Louisville, KY 40207-4931    E-mail: krla@bellsouth.net
For additional information call the contact person in your area or the Right to Life office at (502) 895-5959 

Round Trip - 1 night of lodging
Depart Wednesday, January 17th, 5:00 PM - Travel Overnight
Arrive Thursday Morning Basilica - stay overnight Holiday Inn Express Downtown  
Depart Friday after march for Life
Return Saturday, January 20th, 8:00 AM
***PLEASE NOTE THAT KRLA IS CONSIDERING PROVIDING A TRIP THAT WOULD INCLUDE 2 NIGHTS LODGING AND ONE OVERNIGHT TRAVELING (ON THE WAY BACK). IF ENOUGH PEOPLE ARE INTERESTED IN THIS OPTION. PLEASE CALL THE KRLA OFFICE AT (502) 895-5959. PRICE WOULD BE $50-75$ MORE.

Immaculata Speaker Series with Dr. Peter Kreeft! 

Please join Immaculata Classical Academy at St. Michael's Orthodox Church for an afternoon with renown Catholic author and professor of philosophy at Boston College and The King's College. He is the author of numerous books as well as a popular writer of Christian philosophy, theology and apologetics.http://www.peterkreeft.com

Dr. Kreeft will speak on "The 10 Books That Nobody Should Be Allowed To Die Without Reading". 
Free admission, wine and cheese reception and childcare included. It doesn't get any better than that!
PARABLE OF THE TALENTS
by Bishop Robert Barron November 19, 2017

Details:
Your being increases in the measure that you give it away. That's the law of the gift, and it can be found from end to end of the Bible. One application of this law has to do with faith itself. Your faith will grow only in the measure that you give it away, sharing it with others.

Mass Readings
Reading 1 - Proverbs 31:10-31
Psalm - Psalm 128:1-5
Reading 2 - 1 Thessalonians 5:1-6
Gospel - 

Thursday, November 16, 2017

SVDP CHRISTMAS FOOD BASKETS


LOOKING TOWARDS SUNDAY REFLECTION


 33RD SUNDAY OF ORDINARY TIME
NOVEMBER 19, 2017

OPENING PRAYER: Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty, My memory, my understanding and my entire will, all I have and call my own. You have given all to me. To you, Lord, I return it. Everything is yours; do with it what you will. Give me only your love and your grace; that is enough for me. —St. Ignatius of Loyola

GOSPEL ~Matthew 25:14–30

Jesus told his disciples this parable: “A man going on a journey called in his servants and entrusted his possessions to them. To one he gave five talents; to another, two; to a third, one—to each according to his ability. Then he went away. Immediately the one who received five talents went and traded with them, and made another five. Likewise, the one who received two made another two. But the man who received one went off and dug a hole in the ground and buried his master’s money.

“After a long time the master of those servants came back and settled accounts with them. The one who had received five talents came forward bringing the additional five. He said, ‘Master, you gave me five talents. See, I have made five more.’ His master said to him, ‘Well done, my good and faithful servant. Since you were faithful in small matters, I will give you great responsibilities. Come, share your master’s joy.’ Then the one who had received two talents also came forward and said, ‘Master, you gave me two talents. See, I have made two more.’ His master said to him, ‘Well done, my good and faithful servant. Since you were faithful in small matters, I will give you great responsibilities. Come, share your master’s joy.’

Then the one who had received the one talent came forward and said, ‘Master, I knew you were a demanding person, harvesting where you did not plant and gathering where you did not scatter; so out of fear I went off and buried your talent in the ground. Here it is back.’ His master said to him in reply, ‘You wicked, lazy servant!  knew that I harvest where I did not plant and gather where I did not scatter? Should you not then have put my money in the bank so that I could have got it back with interest on my return? Now then! Take the talent from him and give it to the one with ten. For to everyone who has, more will be given and he will grow rich; but from the one who has not, even what he has will be taken away. And throw this useless servant into the darkness outside, where there will be wailing and grinding of teeth.’”

MEDITATION The parable of the talents can be read on two levels; one is financial responsibility and a possible lesson in investing. What is the other? What does this parable tell us God expects us to do with our talents? What are some of the talents the presenter talks about that you may possess?

PRAYER: Think of yourself as one of the servants in the parable. Consider that a talent would be worth about $300,000 in today’s money. How many “talents” has the master given you? Look at them and then, honestly, decide what you would do if you were given responsibility for $300,000, $900,000 or $3,000,000. Would you be excited about investing it, or would you be afraid to lose it? What would you do with that much money? Now focus on your own gifts and abilities. How are you using them? Are you afraid to “invest” them for fearing of losing them?

RESOLUTION: Take a few minutes to write down some of the talents and gifts you possess. Make a decision to take at least one small step in implementing a neglected or undeveloped talent that you can put in the service of others this week.

CLOSING PRAYER: Loving God, I come to you in thanksgiving, knowing that all I am and all that I have is a gift from you. In faith and love, help me to do your will. I am listening, Lord God. Speak your words into the depth of my soul, that I may hear you clearly. I offer to you this day all the facets of my life, Whether it be at home, at work, or at school— to be patient, to be merciful, to be generous, to be holy. Give me the wisdom and insight to understand your will for me and the fervor to fulfill my good intentions. I offer my gifts of time, talent and possessions to you as a true act of faith, to reflect my love for you and my neighbor. Help me to reach out to others as you, my God, have reached out to me. 

Monday, November 13, 2017

OBITUARY FOR WILLIAM KEITH COLLINS



William Keith Collins, husband of SFX parishioner, Donna Collins, passed away on Sunday, November 12, 2017 at Baptist Health. Keith was 76. He was a retired educator for over 27 years, an alumni of Berea College and the University of Louisville, and served as the assistant principal and athletic director at Bullitt East High School. 

He was preceded in death by his father, William King Collins.  Keith is survived by his loving wife of 50 years, Donna Knoop Collins; daughter, Jennifer Leigh Collins; son, Scott Collins (Amy); his mother, Jessie Collins; niece, Julie Kessler ( Shawn); great nephew, Bryant Miles; special niece, Amy Brafford; sisters-in-law, Julia Woodrome and Sabrina Knoop; and brother-in-law, Robert Knoop. 

A celebration of Keith's life will be 12 p.m. Wednesday at McFarland-Troutman-Proffitt Funeral Home with burial in Highland Memory Gardens.  Friends may visit from 10am until time of the service on Wednesday.  Memorial gifts are suggested to St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church or Hosparus of Louisville.

May Keith have eternal rest and joy in the Kingdom, and may Donna, his family and friends have peace and comfort during this time of their loss.

Saturday, November 11, 2017

Q&A FROM TOWN HALL MEETINGS #2


VIEW TOWN HALL MEETING VIDEO HERE


A CHRISTMAS CAROL DINNER AND PLAY

Tickets go on sale after Mass beginning the weekend of November 18th. Space is limited so get your tickets early. Dinner will be catered by Q-Master Catering and served by our SFX church youth. Admission for Adults is $20.00. and $12.00 for children under 12.


Thursday, November 9, 2017

FAMILY MINISTRIES NEWSLETTER ~ NOVEMBER 2017

"Gratitude Is All In The Attitude . . . "
by Deacon Stephen Bowling 

Well, it's November and you know what that means . . . more pumpkin spice stuff than you can shake a stick at (yuck) and enough articles about the "virtue of thankfulness" to fill the Grand Canyon.
 
Just because we celebrate a great holiday about gratitude on the fourth Thursday of November every year, does NOT necessarily mean that gratitude itself is inherently virtuous. In fact, Jesus reminds us very clearly that this is NOT the case in one of my favorite parables.
 
Do you remember the parable from Luke 18: 9-14 about the Pharisee and the Tax Collector? The one where the Pharisee takes up his place in the front of the synagogue and loudly gives thanks to God that "he is not like other people"? This fellow had the "thankfulness" bit down to a polished stage act, but his "prayer" was in no way pleasing to God, so Christ reminds us . . . 
 
 Continue Reading Here 
"Gratitude And Giving Thanks"
by Martine Bacci-Siegel 
 
I wish to give thanks to you, Lord, with all of my heart; I will tell of your wonderful deeds. - Psalm 9:1

It is our human nature to dwell on the negative. This tendency is called the "negativity bias," or the propensity to focus on problems, annoyances, and injustices in our lives rather than focusing on being grateful for the events or people in our lives that are working and we feel good about.

There are increasing indications that feeling grateful can have a powerfully positive effect on our lives, health, and psychological and emotional well-being. Research by Jeffrey J. Froh, an assistant professor of psychology at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., has found that adults who feel grateful are more optimistic; report more social satisfaction, experience less envy, less depression and fewer physical complaints. They also sleep better and get more exercise. Kids who experience more gratitude do better in school, set higher goals for themselves, derive more satisfaction from life, friends, family, and school and are generally less materialistic and have more desire to give back.

Here are some suggestions to help with being mindful of gratitude . . . 


"Seasonal Survival"
by Michelle Herberger

The clock has "fallen" back. The daylight hours are dwindling away and sooner than one would like to imagine, Thanksgiving, Advent and Christmas will be upon us - the seasons of gratitude, promise, light and hope, of warmth, love and excitement. For those grieving the death of a loved one, this time of year can be a painful  reminder of the empty space at the table; of the hole in the family garment. 

The light of the season may not be as bright as in the past. The air may be a little more cutting than in the past; our home, our heart more empty than in the past.

A loved one has died. It is important to make the distinction that one has not 'lost' this significant person. The person had died. The loved one will always be in the heart and that love will never be lost.

So how does one make it through the 'dark days' of winter and this impending holiday season? Darcie Sims, a well-known psychotherapist, grief management specialist and bereaved parent, offers these suggestions . . . 

"Thanksgiving, Families And Adoptive Families"  
by Ed Harpring

November is one of my favorite times of year. Why?  Fall, Thanksgiving and family.  The month begins with a cool crispness in the air and the myriad of emerging fall colors delighting us with their increasing intensity. 

The end of the month brings Thanksgiving and the once a year Feast that calls us to give thanks for the many special people in our lives. 

Most of us have been blessed to be part of a family, so we enjoy and give gratitude for our spouses, our children, our parents, sibling and close friends.  There's nothing much better than sharing delicious Thanksgiving comfort food and long overdue warm conversations with family members and friends. And while every family has its ups and down, there is a sense of belonging that forms our identity.  

The sense of belonging to family is a universal longing based on our inward desire for something greater than ourselves that we are part of.  St. John Paul in an Apostolic Exhortation on the Family, Familiaris Consortio succinctly stated that the family is "a communion and community of persons where love is the source and the constant impetus for welcoming, respecting and promoting each one of its members in his or her lofty dignity as a person, that is, as a living image of God."
 


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The attached newsletter is published by the Archdiocese of Louisville's Family Ministries Office and is made possible through your generous donations to the Catholic Services Appeal